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Shiro

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Shiro last won the day on April 6 2019

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  1. Shiro

    Platz für Dein Zeug

    Inventar Typen There are three locations where inventory is kept; I will describe all 3 below. Personal inventory - Default hotkey: I - These are the items your character is carrying. Items in your pack can be looted by other players when you are killed, but any items that you have equipped are not lootable. Spirit Bank - Default hotkey: B - This is commonly referred to as the SB and is accessible to all characters on your account. The Spirit Bank is gated by a set number of Imports and Exports, depending on the ruleset of your current campaign. Check the bottom of the inventory window to see how many more items you can pull from or place into it. (Continue reading for tips and tricks from other players for maximizing use of your Spirit Bank.) World Bank - The World Bank (sometimes referred to as the local bank) is represented by chests located at forts, keeps and the faction temple. If you’ve been harvesting out in the wilds, unload that juicy stack of epic copper when you are running by a fort your faction owns to get it out of your inventory. When you are safely back in the faction temple, you can pull it back to your local inventory to either your Spirit Bank or to use. [Note: The local banks are very small right now, but this is a (temporary) technical limitation that will be removed before launch. We have promised to add local chests/containers for shops & houses, too, but that feature is not yet available. (It will also be in before launch.) - J. Todd Coleman] Verwalte Dein Inventar Now that you know the variety of storage available, let’s talk about their risks. If you unlock a character from a campaign, all of its personal inventory, all of its inventory in campaign chests and all of its equipped items are destroyed. Likewise, if you move a character from an Eternal Kingdom into a campaign, all of its equipped items and local inventory are destroyed. Overflow happens when your inventory (personal or Spirit Bank) is given more items than it can hold or an item requires a specific layout of empty boxes to hold it. For example, a vessel is 2 squares across and 3 squares high. If I were to give you a vessel — LOL …. damn, that’s funny … give you … whew, I am tearing up — okay, so if I were to trade you a vessel and the only available space in your personal inventory were the first eight slots on the top line, the trade would be a success but the vessel would not appear in your inventory. An “overflow” message would appear, and you would need to clear out the proper spacing needed for the item. This issue is common with players that Import their Eternal Kingdom-related purchase. If your Spirit Bank already has items in it, a large influx of buildings, building pieces and parcels may not fit. You’ll see an “overflow” message letting you know that you will not be able to add additional items to your Spirit Bank until you’ve cleared out space either by using the excess items, offloading them into another of your inventory storage areas or discarding/sacrificing them. Tips von anderen Krähen One of the amazing aspects of Crowfall is that it has a strong pull to many different types of players. I reached out to a few ‘special’ players that I have been keeping my eye on. These players are gatherer and crafters of the highest level. If there were a Hoarders: Crowfall Edition television show, I would expect many of them to be episode-worthy. I wanted to gather more than just my point of view on inventory management so I asked them the following question, and they were kind enough to send me some responses. While many of these insights come from hardcore guild players, many of their ideas and concepts translate well to managing anyone’s inventory. How do you decide what to keep from an inventory point of view, and what is the one thing you know now about inventory management that you wish you’d known when you were a new player? Gradishar - Winterblades NA I keep everything of value; only things that can’t be sacrificed or otherwise used are discarded. The one thing I would encourage new players to focus on is organization. Consolidate your resources to maximum stacks before exporting them to avoid wasting import/export limits. Surelia - KDS EU It’s more about the focus on distribution and the management of resources for the gatherers and crafters. I would encourage new players to always have two golden apples in their Spirit Bank just in case they accidentally eat one as you try to claim a keep. They should also learn what is of value. If not of value, get rid of it. Cammie - Caldera EU Cammie: I hold onto everything that I know is valuable to crafters of every profession. I try to trade them as fast as possible because my own materials take up a lot of space, but I make sure not to throw away anything another crafter could find useful (unless I am completely out of inventory space, which has never happened). I throw away plants or poor/basic materials as I usually have a very small amount of them (less than five) and things that aren’t usable (soul gems). When I started out, I wish I’d been given a list of materials that are really important and those that I should not force myself to keep. I wish I knew which amounts were considered to be “a lot”, as I thought one stack of “Common” hide is a really high amount before I learned differently. Udienow - Caldera EU Caldera leverages their Discord to keep track of what the guild needs and help their gatherers communicate with each other. The guild leverages a structured Quartermaster system to help our guild better manage the resources we have and the resources we may need. I suggest that new players try to max out amounts before you place items in your Spirit Bank. You only have so many imports and exports. You do not want to waste them. Srathor - Undead Lords NA I keep what is useful, which is almost everything. Due to having multiple accounts, everything has a direct use. (It would be the same if I had a single account and the guild would then keep everything.) The pressure to maximize storage gets to be considerable with five different quality values for everything and hundreds of variations. For new players, remember Ctrl+Right Click to consolidate a stack and Shift+Right Click to split a stack. Build a layout for storage and use it, remember clutter wastes time, so be ruthless in where things go. Truhen in der Wildnis As always I like to try and share a single value-added tip clear at the bottom of the article as a bonus for those willing to struggle through the word salads I sometimes kick out. There is another type of inventory. It’s not useful in all cases, but can be of value if you find yourself in need of trading to a guild or party member. You will often find random chests scattered around the world. They are trade chests that usually have some food and occasionally some crafting materials. A party can stop at one of these chests, dump out their loot and then players can pull from the chest with just a mouse click rather than using the trade interface to pass items to one player at a time. But use caution! When you drop loot into one of these chests to trade between your team, that box is susceptible for any player to loot. I find it a quick way to make sure all the team has food, to spread out building materials and to divvy up the loot from a successful motherlode harvesting run.
  2. Inventar Typen There are three locations where inventory is kept; I will describe all 3 below. Personal inventory - Default hotkey: I - These are the items your character is carrying. Items in your pack can be looted by other players when you are killed, but any items that you have equipped are not lootable. Spirit Bank - Default hotkey: B - This is commonly referred to as the SB and is accessible to all characters on your account. The Spirit Bank is gated by a set number of Imports and Exports, depending on the ruleset of your current campaign. Check the bottom of the inventory window to see how many more items you can pull from or place into it. (Continue reading for tips and tricks from other players for maximizing use of your Spirit Bank.) World Bank - The World Bank (sometimes referred to as the local bank) is represented by chests located at forts, keeps and the faction temple. If you’ve been harvesting out in the wilds, unload that juicy stack of epic copper when you are running by a fort your faction owns to get it out of your inventory. When you are safely back in the faction temple, you can pull it back to your local inventory to either your Spirit Bank or to use. [Note: The local banks are very small right now, but this is a (temporary) technical limitation that will be removed before launch. We have promised to add local chests/containers for shops & houses, too, but that feature is not yet available. (It will also be in before launch.) - J. Todd Coleman] Verwalte Dein Inventar Now that you know the variety of storage available, let’s talk about their risks. If you unlock a character from a campaign, all of its personal inventory, all of its inventory in campaign chests and all of its equipped items are destroyed. Likewise, if you move a character from an Eternal Kingdom into a campaign, all of its equipped items and local inventory are destroyed. Overflow happens when your inventory (personal or Spirit Bank) is given more items than it can hold or an item requires a specific layout of empty boxes to hold it. For example, a vessel is 2 squares across and 3 squares high. If I were to give you a vessel — LOL …. damn, that’s funny … give you … whew, I am tearing up — okay, so if I were to trade you a vessel and the only available space in your personal inventory were the first eight slots on the top line, the trade would be a success but the vessel would not appear in your inventory. An “overflow” message would appear, and you would need to clear out the proper spacing needed for the item. This issue is common with players that Import their Eternal Kingdom-related purchase. If your Spirit Bank already has items in it, a large influx of buildings, building pieces and parcels may not fit. You’ll see an “overflow” message letting you know that you will not be able to add additional items to your Spirit Bank until you’ve cleared out space either by using the excess items, offloading them into another of your inventory storage areas or discarding/sacrificing them. Tips von anderen Krähen One of the amazing aspects of Crowfall is that it has a strong pull to many different types of players. I reached out to a few ‘special’ players that I have been keeping my eye on. These players are gatherer and crafters of the highest level. If there were a Hoarders: Crowfall Edition television show, I would expect many of them to be episode-worthy. I wanted to gather more than just my point of view on inventory management so I asked them the following question, and they were kind enough to send me some responses. While many of these insights come from hardcore guild players, many of their ideas and concepts translate well to managing anyone’s inventory. How do you decide what to keep from an inventory point of view, and what is the one thing you know now about inventory management that you wish you’d known when you were a new player? Gradishar - Winterblades NA I keep everything of value; only things that can’t be sacrificed or otherwise used are discarded. The one thing I would encourage new players to focus on is organization. Consolidate your resources to maximum stacks before exporting them to avoid wasting import/export limits. Surelia - KDS EU It’s more about the focus on distribution and the management of resources for the gatherers and crafters. I would encourage new players to always have two golden apples in their Spirit Bank just in case they accidentally eat one as you try to claim a keep. They should also learn what is of value. If not of value, get rid of it. Cammie - Caldera EU Cammie: I hold onto everything that I know is valuable to crafters of every profession. I try to trade them as fast as possible because my own materials take up a lot of space, but I make sure not to throw away anything another crafter could find useful (unless I am completely out of inventory space, which has never happened). I throw away plants or poor/basic materials as I usually have a very small amount of them (less than five) and things that aren’t usable (soul gems). When I started out, I wish I’d been given a list of materials that are really important and those that I should not force myself to keep. I wish I knew which amounts were considered to be “a lot”, as I thought one stack of “Common” hide is a really high amount before I learned differently. Udienow - Caldera EU Caldera leverages their Discord to keep track of what the guild needs and help their gatherers communicate with each other. The guild leverages a structured Quartermaster system to help our guild better manage the resources we have and the resources we may need. I suggest that new players try to max out amounts before you place items in your Spirit Bank. You only have so many imports and exports. You do not want to waste them. Srathor - Undead Lords NA I keep what is useful, which is almost everything. Due to having multiple accounts, everything has a direct use. (It would be the same if I had a single account and the guild would then keep everything.) The pressure to maximize storage gets to be considerable with five different quality values for everything and hundreds of variations. For new players, remember Ctrl+Right Click to consolidate a stack and Shift+Right Click to split a stack. Build a layout for storage and use it, remember clutter wastes time, so be ruthless in where things go. Truhen in der Wildnis As always I like to try and share a single value-added tip clear at the bottom of the article as a bonus for those willing to struggle through the word salads I sometimes kick out. There is another type of inventory. It’s not useful in all cases, but can be of value if you find yourself in need of trading to a guild or party member. You will often find random chests scattered around the world. They are trade chests that usually have some food and occasionally some crafting materials. A party can stop at one of these chests, dump out their loot and then players can pull from the chest with just a mouse click rather than using the trade interface to pass items to one player at a time. But use caution! When you drop loot into one of these chests to trade between your team, that box is susceptible for any player to loot. I find it a quick way to make sure all the team has food, to spread out building materials and to divvy up the loot from a successful motherlode harvesting run. Ganzen Artikel lesen
  3. First, the basics: Most of you know this, but I’ll repeat it for the benefit of our readers. The foundation of Crowfall is time-limited, competitive world servers. Each of these is servers unique — a sprawling Throne War that covers a handful of game worlds. When we say each Campaign is unique we mean it: the maps are unique, the rules are unique and the outcomes are unique. Since last December, we’ve been running these in pairs: we launch one campaign in the US with a start and end time generally centered on CST and one in the EU with a start and end time generally centered on CEST. We start and end these on the same day, and because we allow U.S. and E.U. players to play together we must keep them both running the exact same version of the software. This staggered scheduling effort is by design so that the most important moments (the early land rush, the nightly siege windows and the inevitable end-of-campaign carnage) will coincide with the work and RL schedules of most of that campaign’s participants. We also run the campaigns linearly; we start new campaigns as soon as the old ones come to an end. Here’s the unique challenge: What happens when we need to change the rules between versions? The next game update version in the pipe (5.8.2) includes significant balance changes related to scoring of victory points. These changes are the result of feedback from our players, including an insightful review of The Strategy Game by veteran MMO player, and early Crowfall supporter Blazzen. Blazzen’s assessment highlighted some of the challenges that can arise if the capture bonus jeopardizes the strategy game rather than enhances it. He points out that it is important not to “overly incentivize “flipping” or “trading” capture locations” and that “holding and defending your capture points should always be the best option.” Blazzen’s feedback combined with our own tracking and analysis lead us to initiate further changes. This evaluation was done by our own Thomas “Hanseshadow” Eidson. His goal was to analyze the scoring data generated post-release of the catch-up bonus. His analysis led to further refinements to ensure that, “while a faction can pull ahead, a campaign is not predictably won and abandoned.” You can check out his update offering a look at the latest balance changes to the scoring and bonus system. Since US and EU campaigns are on the same version that means, by definition, we can’t change the scoring without doing so in the middle of one of those campaigns. The same thing goes for all our design data: crafting recipes, skills, powers, items, you name it. Eventually we’ll try to move some of this stuff to versioning and maintain multiple data repositories for different versions, but that’s a significant undertaking and not worth doing when the underlying data structures are still in flux. The upshot of this is, in order to be able to move as quickly as possible, and to be responsive to your feedback, we need to be able to change the rules out of from under you in mid-campaign. I know it’s a bit strange, but it’s the quickest way to iterate — and as we move to longer and longer campaigns, that becomes even more important. So, here is my proposal: Right now, while we are in pre-alpha running non-sanctioned campaigns, we change stuff when we need to. It may result in some scoring issues, but that’s the lesser of the evils if it helps the overall development of the game move forward. When we run sanctioned campaigns, we try to avoid this at all costs. We limit these changes only to issues that are game breaking or that everyone agrees are fundamental (i.e. the problem is bad enough to warrant “putting our finger on the scale”). Once we get to launch (and beyond), we try to minimize this — and by that point, the versioning should be in place to make it easier to support multiple scenarios at once. To this end, we’ll be making the changes to the scoring today as part of the 5.8.2 update. We’ll be doing it this morning before the EU and US campaigns complete.
  4. First, the basics: Most of you know this, but I’ll repeat it for the benefit of our readers. The foundation of Crowfall is time-limited, competitive world servers. Each of these is servers unique — a sprawling Throne War that covers a handful of game worlds. When we say each Campaign is unique we mean it: the maps are unique, the rules are unique and the outcomes are unique. Since last December, we’ve been running these in pairs: we launch one campaign in the US with a start and end time generally centered on CST and one in the EU with a start and end time generally centered on CEST. We start and end these on the same day, and because we allow U.S. and E.U. players to play together we must keep them both running the exact same version of the software. This staggered scheduling effort is by design so that the most important moments (the early land rush, the nightly siege windows and the inevitable end-of-campaign carnage) will coincide with the work and RL schedules of most of that campaign’s participants. We also run the campaigns linearly; we start new campaigns as soon as the old ones come to an end. Here’s the unique challenge: What happens when we need to change the rules between versions? The next game update version in the pipe (5.8.2) includes significant balance changes related to scoring of victory points. These changes are the result of feedback from our players, including an insightful review of The Strategy Game by veteran MMO player, and early Crowfall supporter Blazzen. Blazzen’s assessment highlighted some of the challenges that can arise if the capture bonus jeopardizes the strategy game rather than enhances it. He points out that it is important not to “overly incentivize “flipping” or “trading” capture locations” and that “holding and defending your capture points should always be the best option.” Blazzen’s feedback combined with our own tracking and analysis lead us to initiate further changes. This evaluation was done by our own Thomas “Hanseshadow” Eidson. His goal was to analyze the scoring data generated post-release of the catch-up bonus. His analysis led to further refinements to ensure that, “while a faction can pull ahead, a campaign is not predictably won and abandoned.” You can check out his update offering a look at the latest balance changes to the scoring and bonus system. Since US and EU campaigns are on the same version that means, by definition, we can’t change the scoring without doing so in the middle of one of those campaigns. The same thing goes for all our design data: crafting recipes, skills, powers, items, you name it. Eventually we’ll try to move some of this stuff to versioning and maintain multiple data repositories for different versions, but that’s a significant undertaking and not worth doing when the underlying data structures are still in flux. The upshot of this is, in order to be able to move as quickly as possible, and to be responsive to your feedback, we need to be able to change the rules out of from under you in mid-campaign. I know it’s a bit strange, but it’s the quickest way to iterate — and as we move to longer and longer campaigns, that becomes even more important. So, here is my proposal: Right now, while we are in pre-alpha running non-sanctioned campaigns, we change stuff when we need to. It may result in some scoring issues, but that’s the lesser of the evils if it helps the overall development of the game move forward. When we run sanctioned campaigns, we try to avoid this at all costs. We limit these changes only to issues that are game breaking or that everyone agrees are fundamental (i.e. the problem is bad enough to warrant “putting our finger on the scale”). Once we get to launch (and beyond), we try to minimize this — and by that point, the versioning should be in place to make it easier to support multiple scenarios at once. To this end, we’ll be making the changes to the scoring today as part of the 5.8.2 update. We’ll be doing it this morning before the EU and US campaigns complete. Ganzen Artikel lesen
  5. Shiro

    Satyr

    Geschichte Book of Gifts, Chapter 5: 8 - 42 8 In the Year of the Eternal Spring, the creatures of the Faewood prepared a revelry in the name of their most beloved of gods, Cybele. 9 The festival was filled with feasting and song, dancing and drink. 10 There was no place for the measure of time as the Virgin Goddess frolicked and flirted among her people. 11 Days melted away into weeks, and the weeks were lost in the dream. 12 The wine was endless for 13 Cybele would not let her children want for refreshment. 14 On the twenty-second day, there appeared among the gaiety a wild goat, a cow, and a turkey. 15 They passed into the throng of revelers and 16 were welcomed with the glee and encouragement afforded old friends. 17 The turkey, upon seeing the face of the Virgin Goddess among them, 18 was so enraptured by her exquisiteness that he sought to gain her favor. 19 Surely would she be impressed by his feats of beauty! 20 He fanned his tail and did strut, capturing the attention of many by the size and shape of his feathers. 21 But Cybele found entertainment in the theater of her people, and did pay the conceited turkey no mind. 22 The cow, too, did fall enamored by Cybele and, too, sought to gain her favor. 23Surely she would she be impressed by her feats of strength! 24 And so did she lumber about, moving rocks thrice her size and felling trees with her head. 25 But Cybele found joy in her drink, and did pay the boisterous cow no mind. 26 The goat did not notice Cybele, for never had he been invited to such a fanciful party! 27 Crowns of flowers were placed upon his horns, flagons of mead were proffered of which he heartily partook. 28 The citizens of the Faewood braided its beard and took up its two front hooves so that they might dance with it. 29 The goat, enchanted and giddy, balanced himself, dancing and cavorting of his own accord. 30 The festival parted as the goat careened to and fro to the music, first on its hind legs and then on its fore. Every eye watched the creature and 31 upon every lip was a jubilant cry, 32for none had seen such a sight in the Faewood. Cybele, herself, let out an elated squeal. 33 More and more flagons were brought out to encourage the goat. 34 Very soon, he had lacked the balance to walk and the capacity to dance, 35 and sooner still lacked the strength even to stand. He faltered, and did plunge into a fountain of wine with enough force to douse the nearby revelers. 36 Delighted by it’s earnest drunken love of life, 37 Cybele drew up the sodden goat in her arms and placed a holy kiss upon its forehead. 38 His body did alter; his eyes grew bright and his beard grew soft. 39 With a kiss she gave him the gift of sentience, and 40 from this gift was born the Race of Satyrs who would be forever loyal to their most Holy Maiden Goddess. 41 And on this day, the longest gloaming in Summertide, our friend the Satyr gained his voice. We mark this as the Day of Reverie, 42 which our Lady would have us celebrate yearly with a feast of wine, steak, and breast of roast fowl. Bildmaterial
  6. schrieb JAAYYJAAY in seinem Artikel „Joining and Managing Crowfall Guilds“ auf MarkeeDragon.com. Wie MMO-Veteranen wissen, entsteht zwischen Gildenmitgliedern oft eine tiefe Verbundenheit, über große Entfernungen und alle Server-Grenzen hinweg. Häufig formen sich hier sogar lebenslange Freundschaften. Welche Gilde ist die richtige? Natürlich kann man sich als einsamer Wolf wie ein Söldner durch Crowfall kämpfen, aus den von Jaay erwähnten Gründen ist es allerdings sehr empfehlenswert, sich einem Krähenschwarm anzuschließen. Eine Gilde zu finden ist einfach. Vor allem als neuer Spieler ist es jedoch wichtig, die richtige Gilde für euch zu finden. Dabei gibt es mehrere Möglichkeiten, in Crowfall etablierte Gilden zu finden, die gerade auf der Suche nach neuen Mitgliedern sind. Am besten loggst Du Dich dafür zuerst einmal auf der Webseite von Crowfall ein. Gehe in der Navigationsleiste zu Community -> Gilden, um zur Gildensuche zu gelangen. Dort kannst Du Deine Suche anhand von Kontrollkästchen näher einschränken. Setze zum Beispiel ein Häkchen bei „Rekrutiert“, um Dir Ergebnisse von Gilden anzeigen zu lassen, die gerade über die Webseite neue Mitglieder aufnehmen. Wenn Du eine Gilde siehst, von der Du denkst, dass sie zu Dir passen könnte, klicke auf die Schaltfläche „Request to Join“. Der Gildenleiter wird daraufhin benachrichtigt. Eine weitere Möglichkeit, eine Gilde zu finden, die zu Deinem Spielstil passt, ist das Forum zur Gildenrekrutierung. Dort findest Du Threads, in denen Gildenleiter und -mitglieder Informationen über ihre Ziele, ihre Teamphilosophie, die hauptsächlich gesprochene Sprache und Spitzenzeiten teilen. Überfliege diese Threads am besten einfach mal, unter anderem auch, um zu erfahren, wie Du sie kontaktieren kannst, wenn Du beitreten möchtet. Live-Streams sind eine weitere gute Möglichkeit, den richtigen Krähenschwarm zu finden. Sowohl die Hosts als auch die Chat-Zuschauer beantworten gerne Fragen von neugierigen Neulingen, die mehr über Crowfall erfahren möchten. So kommt es häufig vor, dass wir mit eigenen Augen beobachten können, wie neue Spieler von Gilden in die Community aufgenommen werden, um dort Fuß zu fassen. Etwas Hilfe beim Aufbau gefällig? Zusätzlichen Gilden-Features – sowohl im Spiel als auch auf der Webseite – befinden sich in der Entwicklung. Wie immer ist auch hier das Feedback aus der Community integraler Bestandteil des Prozesses. Lass ArtCraft daher wissen, welche Tools und Features Du benötigst und Dir wünschst, um Dein Gildendasein in Crowfall so gut wie möglich zu gestalten. Das CFC Hosting Alternativ bieten auch wir Dir eine flexible Lösung zur Suche von Gilden oder Gildenmitgliedern. Wirf einfach einen Blick in den folgenden Aritkel: Schon Teil einer großen Gemeinschaft? Ganzen Artikel lesen
  7. The embargo system has always been a core component of the Crowfall® experience. Many of the proposed campaign rulesets hinge on its use to restrict the items that are brought into a new campaign, and likewise what spoils of war are taken out when the world succumbs to the Hunger. As It Is Now Currently, there are two separate world types: ones with embargo and ones without. Eternal Kingdoms (personal player worlds) and the God’s Reach do not have embargo; you’re free to take items in and out of these worlds without restriction. The campaigns, however, usually have limits on how many items can be moved into or out of them. In worlds with embargo limits, the transfer of items from one character on your account to another is done through the Spirit Bank and the limits on import and export are displayed there. Local storage within the world is achieved with world banks and local banks. Here are the current definitions of banks in Crowfall: Spirit Bank - The account-level bank. This bank is shared across all vessels on an account and can be accessed from any world. World bank - The world-level bank. These exist at the temple and are vessel-specific (meaning no other account or vessel can access your items in it). You can use this bank to withdraw items from any local bank. Local bank - The location-level bank. These exist in certain locations in campaigns (forts, keeps, and the temple) and are vessel-specific. They’re meant to be used as local, temporary storage while gathering items. Changes In The Pipeline Much of the way worlds without embargo restrictions work will remain the same. You’ll be able to move your vessel in and out of these non-embargo worlds without regulation, taking items as you please. Worlds with embargo restrictions are about to undergo some very important changes. Namely, the export of items will no longer happen strictly through the Spirit Bank UI the way it does now. But we’ll get to that in a bit. First, how do you get your sweet gear into a Campaign? Importing: Gear Up Imagine this: You’ve spent some time leveling up in the God’s Reach and met a cool guild that gave you some gear when they helped you train in an Eternal Kingdom. Now, you’re ready to join your guildmates in braving the campaign world. What about those goodies your new friends gave you? Can you bring them in? The answer is that it depends on the campaign. When you attempt to join a campaign with a vessel that has inventory or equipment, the system will automatically compare the import rules to your current items. If you have too many items (in the case of high-restriction campaigns), you will be alerted that your vessel cannot join that world because of the embargo rules. You can then move that vessel into an Eternal Kingdom or a world without embargo limitations and manually clear out some of your inventory. When your inventory can be successfully imported, you’ll see a confirmation box when you try to join a campaign. This dialogue box will show you the number of import tokens allowed in the campaign as well as how many you’ll use to import your current inventory and equipment. Since import and export tokens will be shared across all vessels on your account, this lets you make an informed decision on how many you want to use with this particular vessel. If you’re signing up for a very restricted campaign, make sure you use your import tokens to bring in your very best gear. Exporting: Claim Your Profit You’ve successfully imported your best equipment, you fought like mad in the campaign, and now you want to enjoy your spoils of war. Here is where the definitions of the banks change somewhat. Local banks will be removed entirely; item storage will depend completely on your inventory, the world bank or Spirit Bank and caravans (keep an eye out for more news on these in the future). The Spirit Bank will still act as account-level storage that can be accessed by any vessel on your account; however, you can no longer just pull it up at will when you’re in the world. Instead, in worlds that have embargo limits, you’ll need to find a world bank. Through world banks, you can store items for export (in worlds without embargo, these same world bank locations become the place to open your Spirit Bank). Items that you place here can then be accessed from the lobby and moved to your Spirit Bank at the cost of export tokens. Each campaign’s world bank is shared between all vessels subscribed to that campaign. When a vessel leaves a campaign, either through the natural conclusion of the world or by manually unlocking that vessel, the inventory and equipment that were on the vessel are placed into the world bank automatically. (If your world bank was already full, these additional items go into an overflow state and can only be accessed once you’ve cleared some space.) You can then export the items you’d like to keep from the world bank to your Spirit Bank in the lobby. Keep an eye on those export tokens; once they’re used up, the world bank will close and any remaining items will be deleted. Remember, too, that import and export tokens for each campaign are shared by all vessels across one account. So, if you have multiple vessels in the same campaign, make sure you keep track of the items each of them has stored when you export your items. Each account can have a maximum of nine world banks open. This means, after the end of a campaign, you’ll need to make sure you export anything left in your world bank if you want to join a new campaign. Storage Strategy It’s easy to see why we’re excited about the changes to the embargo system. With each campaign’s import and export tokens moved to the account-level (and shared between the vessels in that campaign) and the need to travel to a world bank in order to export items from that world, there will be an additional layer of strategy injected into the game. Choices will have consequences, especially in worlds with limited imports and exports.
  8. The embargo system has always been a core component of the Crowfall® experience. Many of the proposed campaign rulesets hinge on its use to restrict the items that are brought into a new campaign, and likewise what spoils of war are taken out when the world succumbs to the Hunger. As It Is Now Currently, there are two separate world types: ones with embargo and ones without. Eternal Kingdoms (personal player worlds) and the God’s Reach do not have embargo; you’re free to take items in and out of these worlds without restriction. The campaigns, however, usually have limits on how many items can be moved into or out of them. In worlds with embargo limits, the transfer of items from one character on your account to another is done through the Spirit Bank and the limits on import and export are displayed there. Local storage within the world is achieved with world banks and local banks. Here are the current definitions of banks in Crowfall: Spirit Bank - The account-level bank. This bank is shared across all vessels on an account and can be accessed from any world. World bank - The world-level bank. These exist at the temple and are vessel-specific (meaning no other account or vessel can access your items in it). You can use this bank to withdraw items from any local bank. Local bank - The location-level bank. These exist in certain locations in campaigns (forts, keeps, and the temple) and are vessel-specific. They’re meant to be used as local, temporary storage while gathering items. Changes In The Pipeline Much of the way worlds without embargo restrictions work will remain the same. You’ll be able to move your vessel in and out of these non-embargo worlds without regulation, taking items as you please. Worlds with embargo restrictions are about to undergo some very important changes. Namely, the export of items will no longer happen strictly through the Spirit Bank UI the way it does now. But we’ll get to that in a bit. First, how do you get your sweet gear into a Campaign? Importing: Gear Up Imagine this: You’ve spent some time leveling up in the God’s Reach and met a cool guild that gave you some gear when they helped you train in an Eternal Kingdom. Now, you’re ready to join your guildmates in braving the campaign world. What about those goodies your new friends gave you? Can you bring them in? The answer is that it depends on the campaign. When you attempt to join a campaign with a vessel that has inventory or equipment, the system will automatically compare the import rules to your current items. If you have too many items (in the case of high-restriction campaigns), you will be alerted that your vessel cannot join that world because of the embargo rules. You can then move that vessel into an Eternal Kingdom or a world without embargo limitations and manually clear out some of your inventory. When your inventory can be successfully imported, you’ll see a confirmation box when you try to join a campaign. This dialogue box will show you the number of import tokens allowed in the campaign as well as how many you’ll use to import your current inventory and equipment. Since import and export tokens will be shared across all vessels on your account, this lets you make an informed decision on how many you want to use with this particular vessel. If you’re signing up for a very restricted campaign, make sure you use your import tokens to bring in your very best gear. Exporting: Claim Your Profit You’ve successfully imported your best equipment, you fought like mad in the campaign, and now you want to enjoy your spoils of war. Here is where the definitions of the banks change somewhat. Local banks will be removed entirely; item storage will depend completely on your inventory, the world bank or Spirit Bank and caravans (keep an eye out for more news on these in the future). The Spirit Bank will still act as account-level storage that can be accessed by any vessel on your account; however, you can no longer just pull it up at will when you’re in the world. Instead, in worlds that have embargo limits, you’ll need to find a world bank. Through world banks, you can store items for export (in worlds without embargo, these same world bank locations become the place to open your Spirit Bank). Items that you place here can then be accessed from the lobby and moved to your Spirit Bank at the cost of export tokens. Each campaign’s world bank is shared between all vessels subscribed to that campaign. When a vessel leaves a campaign, either through the natural conclusion of the world or by manually unlocking that vessel, the inventory and equipment that were on the vessel are placed into the world bank automatically. (If your world bank was already full, these additional items go into an overflow state and can only be accessed once you’ve cleared some space.) You can then export the items you’d like to keep from the world bank to your Spirit Bank in the lobby. Keep an eye on those export tokens; once they’re used up, the world bank will close and any remaining items will be deleted. Remember, too, that import and export tokens for each campaign are shared by all vessels across one account. So, if you have multiple vessels in the same campaign, make sure you keep track of the items each of them has stored when you export your items. Each account can have a maximum of nine world banks open. This means, after the end of a campaign, you’ll need to make sure you export anything left in your world bank if you want to join a new campaign. Storage Strategy It’s easy to see why we’re excited about the changes to the embargo system. With each campaign’s import and export tokens moved to the account-level (and shared between the vessels in that campaign) and the need to travel to a world bank in order to export items from that world, there will be an additional layer of strategy injected into the game. Choices will have consequences, especially in worlds with limited imports and exports. Ganzen Artikel lesen
  9. With 11 Classes and 12 Races, Crowfall offers the ability to tap into your inner Crow by creating a character tailored completely to you. Each Race has its own unique advantages, and vessels can be further customized with skills, Disciplines, Talents, and equipment. The sheer amount of variety means that there is a combination to suit every playstyle. Creating a character is the first step in your Crowfall journey. To make that process easier, CrusaderW produced a video guide that offers an in-depth look at the available options, including the finer details like passive abilities and promotion classes. With this video, you’ll be well on your way to creating an Eternal Hero that will bring you glory, wealth, and power!
  10. With 11 Classes and 12 Races, Crowfall offers the ability to tap into your inner Crow by creating a character tailored completely to you. Each Race has its own unique advantages, and vessels can be further customized with skills, Disciplines, Talents, and equipment. The sheer amount of variety means that there is a combination to suit every playstyle. Creating a character is the first step in your Crowfall journey. To make that process easier, CrusaderW produced a video guide that offers an in-depth look at the available options, including the finer details like passive abilities and promotion classes. With this video, you’ll be well on your way to creating an Eternal Hero that will bring you glory, wealth, and power! Ganzen Artikel lesen
  11. Shiro

    Die Schildwache

    With quiet thanks to her necromancer for the strength of her new vessel, Ser Merlida Clearthorne’s expedition into the Dying Worlds began. Whatever training had been afforded her by more experienced Crows would never have felt like enough, she was sure. But it was time that she ventured beyond the God’s Reach and truly began the fight for the glory of Kane. As she passed through the runegate and into a sprawling, ravaged temple, she felt the expanse of the universe unfold before her. The centerpiece of this sanctuary, immediately across from the semi-circle of runegates, was a statue on a stepped pedestal. Merlida picked her way through the ruins, drawn inexplicably towards the sculpture. Life-size and intricately detailed, the statue portrayed a Stoneborn standing guard in armor the likes of which she had never seen, not even in the halls of her lords. One hand held a greatsword that spanned nearly the same height as the statue itself, the other held a broken crown. Each detail was exquisite, and she marveled at how long it must have taken the sculptor to carve such life into the stone. Even the roots that erupted from the statue’s legs and wound their way deep into the ground looked too real. She bent down to inspect them, reaching out with a steady hand to brush her fingers against the carved wood. Her brow furrowed. It was actually wood. The hairs on the back of her neck suddenly prickled as the distinct feeling of being watched washed over her. She glanced up, and her gaze locked with a pair of eyes. Living eyes. Merlida balked and drew her dagger, scrambling backwards. This wasn’t a statue at all! The Stoneborn’s eyes followed her, but she couldn’t see a hint of malice or even irritation behind them. Tension hung in the air for a long moment, long enough that a sliver of doubt crept into Merlida’s mind. Was she imagining things? The statue shifted, unleashing a small rain of dust and a creaking of entangled roots that were now intertwined into a chest seemingly made of stone. A low, rumbling voice came forward. “You should not be here, daughter of Kane.” The Stoneborn’s head lifted with eyes that fixed on her coldly. “This is no place for the living.” Merlida squinted and looked at the destruction around her, not yet willing to sheathe her blade. A cold wind tugged at the tattered banners on the walls, but otherwise, nothing moved. Nothing lived. “These are ruins. Why protect them?” “I am of the Sentinel,” the Stoneborn said. “This is my temple to protect. This is the house of Gaea, my mother. A home for the lost. A sanctuary in the darkness. I was carved to guard it until the end of time.” “You’ll die”, Merlida said, finally sheathing her dagger. She wasn’t even sure if the stranger could move, with feet rooted in place. Even if it were possible, there was no inclination to do so. “This world is dying,” she said, “and you’ll die with it.” “Yes,” the Sentinel replied. “The Hunger has touched this world. We could feel it in our bones the moment it happened, like a chill wind in an ancient tomb. That was when my vigil began. As it spread and began to consume the world, the worshippers dwindled. Some fell trying to fight it. Most fled to other worlds, to what little warmth lingers. I will not flee.” Their head turned back to its vigilant position, eyes no longer lingering on her. “I will watch this world die, as is my holy task in the Great Work. The Hunger will destroy this world, as every world. And on this world, it will destroy this temple last, because I will stand here and give what remains of my warmth, and my life, to this place. I will not abandon my post. I will stare down the Hunger as it devours everything around me. You are one of them, yes?” they asked Merlida. “Sent by the Gods to pick clean the bones of this place?” She replied, just above a whisper, a simple “Yes.” “Then I will guide you, as I guide the others. Tell me what you seek. I will be here when you return - if you return. It will be because of me that this world will not die alone.”
  12. Shiro

    Die Schildwache

    With quiet thanks to her necromancer for the strength of her new vessel, Ser Merlida Clearthorne’s expedition into the Dying Worlds began. Whatever training had been afforded her by more experienced Crows would never have felt like enough, she was sure. But it was time that she ventured beyond the God’s Reach and truly began the fight for the glory of Kane. As she passed through the runegate and into a sprawling, ravaged temple, she felt the expanse of the universe unfold before her. The centerpiece of this sanctuary, immediately across from the semi-circle of runegates, was a statue on a stepped pedestal. Merlida picked her way through the ruins, drawn inexplicably towards the sculpture. Life-size and intricately detailed, the statue portrayed a Stoneborn standing guard in armor the likes of which she had never seen, not even in the halls of her lords. One hand held a greatsword that spanned nearly the same height as the statue itself, the other held a broken crown. Each detail was exquisite, and she marveled at how long it must have taken the sculptor to carve such life into the stone. Even the roots that erupted from the statue’s legs and wound their way deep into the ground looked too real. She bent down to inspect them, reaching out with a steady hand to brush her fingers against the carved wood. Her brow furrowed. It was actually wood. The hairs on the back of her neck suddenly prickled as the distinct feeling of being watched washed over her. She glanced up, and her gaze locked with a pair of eyes. Living eyes. Merlida balked and drew her dagger, scrambling backwards. This wasn’t a statue at all! The Stoneborn’s eyes followed her, but she couldn’t see a hint of malice or even irritation behind them. Tension hung in the air for a long moment, long enough that a sliver of doubt crept into Merlida’s mind. Was she imagining things? The statue shifted, unleashing a small rain of dust and a creaking of entangled roots that were now intertwined into a chest seemingly made of stone. A low, rumbling voice came forward. “You should not be here, daughter of Kane.” The Stoneborn’s head lifted with eyes that fixed on her coldly. “This is no place for the living.” Merlida squinted and looked at the destruction around her, not yet willing to sheathe her blade. A cold wind tugged at the tattered banners on the walls, but otherwise, nothing moved. Nothing lived. “These are ruins. Why protect them?” “I am of the Sentinel,” the Stoneborn said. “This is my temple to protect. This is the house of Gaea, my mother. A home for the lost. A sanctuary in the darkness. I was carved to guard it until the end of time.” “You’ll die”, Merlida said, finally sheathing her dagger. She wasn’t even sure if the stranger could move, with feet rooted in place. Even if it were possible, there was no inclination to do so. “This world is dying,” she said, “and you’ll die with it.” “Yes,” the Sentinel replied. “The Hunger has touched this world. We could feel it in our bones the moment it happened, like a chill wind in an ancient tomb. That was when my vigil began. As it spread and began to consume the world, the worshippers dwindled. Some fell trying to fight it. Most fled to other worlds, to what little warmth lingers. I will not flee.” Their head turned back to its vigilant position, eyes no longer lingering on her. “I will watch this world die, as is my holy task in the Great Work. The Hunger will destroy this world, as every world. And on this world, it will destroy this temple last, because I will stand here and give what remains of my warmth, and my life, to this place. I will not abandon my post. I will stare down the Hunger as it devours everything around me. You are one of them, yes?” they asked Merlida. “Sent by the Gods to pick clean the bones of this place?” She replied, just above a whisper, a simple “Yes.” “Then I will guide you, as I guide the others. Tell me what you seek. I will be here when you return - if you return. It will be because of me that this world will not die alone.” Ganzen Artikel lesen
  13. Crowfall is a game that doesn’t use the sort of traditional storytelling that’s common to role-playing games, i.e. usually executed via missions or cinematic moments. Instead, Crowfall uses “visual storytelling”, telling a story without the use of language or text. Visual Storytelling: Bringin Worlds To Life When you enter the worlds of Crowfall, you will quickly become aware of your role as an Eternal Champion in a dying world, fighting for the gods. However, how your personal story in the game unfolds is unique to you. This is similar to looking at a narrative painting or work of art and find that there is enough information visually to give you a sense of a story without needing words or an explanation behind it. Then, as a viewer, you put yourself into the image and create your own interpretation from the things you see. Often when viewing art we piece together a story in our minds that creates the context for what we are viewing based on our frame of reference, experiences and aspirations. In that way, we create a story in our mind that we “see” as part of that piece of art and because it is “our” story it is more personal and more meaningful. Visual storytelling in games is how we personalize the story to the player and give context to the greater narrative threads in the world that evolve as you play. Storytelling in Crowfall is different from other games in that we don’t have a single narrative that every player follows as they play. Crowfall features a dynamic world where many of the elements are responsive to player choices, actions and motivations. In this way, the game offers players the ability to be at the center of a series of unfolding events in a story that is given context by the players themselves. Up to this point in the development cycle, we’ve been focused on the essential systems that make up our core gameplay experience and proving out our procedural world generation technology. These systems are the foundation of our gameplay and create the playscape for our storytelling. Crowfall has deep and rich lore that connects the player to the creation of the universe and the events leading up to the current state of the dying worlds. We also have a pantheon of gods that assert their own influence over the Crows (players) and these worlds. Although many of the facets of the story may not be visible now, as we continue to evolve our world generation we will begin layering in more visual storytelling. This process will reveal our overarching storyline and introduce the influences that are impacting the Crowfall Universe. The goal is to create a living world that sets the stage for players to create their own stories and build their legacies. Ancient History: Connectin Players To The Gods The Crowfall universe was once completely uninhabited by anyone other than the Stoneborn, the children of Gaia and Kane. These firstborn sons erected monumental temples and structures in honor of the gods and created the first examples of architecture in these worlds. Temple Environment Concept Stoneborn temples and structures were built in reverence to the gods when no other beings yet existed. They are reflective of Crowfall’s ancient history and are a visual thread connecting players to the gods. These structures have withstood the test of time, but we see them now as ruins in the dying worlds as a result of the impact of the corruptive influence of the Hunger, the mysterious contagion that is spreading across the worlds. Concept of Ancient Stoneborn Ruins found in the World Recent History: What Existed Before The Worlds Became Corrupted In more recent history, other races and creatures have begun to inhabit these worlds and are leaving their marks on it. As you arrive as a Crow, the worlds are deteriorating, dying. With time running out, there are tribes and forces roaming the worlds in search of valuable relics and resources, valuable artifacts, left behind by the people who once inhabited these places. Recently, we saw the rise of the war tribes in the world, but aside from these tribes, there’s very little evidence of the people who originally populated and settled this world, peacefully or otherwise. Currently, through the efforts of both design work and art production we are building the gameplay and visual narrative to give context to those who were once here and to tell the story of these worlds. We have a lot of art that hasn’t been implemented yet into the game. We have a couple of ways of bringing this to fruition. Some world environment pieces, or “parcels”, utilize what we call data layers. These are layers of the world set design that are turned on and off to create a feeling of totally new gameplay areas. This is where art is able to do the most custom-crafted storytelling experience. Although we are limited by the boundaries of the parcel itself, within that parcel we can lay in props any way we choose. We’ve already begun using these data layers to set up the war tribe and military camps found in our most recent campaign worlds. If you’ve played in any of our recent factional wars or campaigns, you are familiar with the forts and keeps in the siege zones. Players find and use resources to build up these strongholds to a fully-constructed state to hold and contest over. Outside of the siege zones, it would make sense to see the ruins of, and to tell the story of, additional battles from years gone by. In this concept, you see some remains of an old stone wall that may have been the gate to a great city from the past. A caravan of some sort looks like it was traveling through the gate, maybe in an attempt to escape when war broke out. In any case, nature has started to reclaim the relics left behind, and we know that this must have happened a long time ago. We get the sense of a story of a world left in turmoil and ruin from an image like this one. The combinatory possibilities utilizing data layers within natural terrain parcels gives us many opportunities to create areas within the world that look and feel different and reinforce the narrative of a dying world. In one area, the parcel may be crafted with this type of set dressing in place, or it could be entirely natural and wild without any architectural remains. Some of these parcels may be built to contain multiple data layers that can be turned on or off for additional storytelling impact. We might have a village alongside a road that would become our base data layer set. Then we could turn on a layer that contains vines and moss covering the dilapidated houses to tell the story of a village that has long been abandoned. Or we might turn on the smoldering and charred layer with ransacked looking crates and wagons in the street to tell the story of a war tribe having passed through recently and left destruction in their wake. We can create this level of depth throughout the game worlds to build greater visual diversity and interest in the world, exposing a robust history unique to each world. In addition to the visual storytelling we are planning, we are also building variant designs for the layout of the forts and keeps. If you’ve been testing along with us you know that the current fort and keep layout is the same across all the worlds. We plan to start diversifying these areas to give a texture that connects the player to the world and the events that led to the current state. To complement these new layouts, we are also planning on adding in a variety of textures for the walls to add even more flavor and character. Final Notes We’ve been procedurally generating new maps for campaigns for months now. The worlds are evolving into unique and diverse areas that are interesting to explore. As a team, we’ve always wanted to push the look and feel of the world much further to add more depth that gives rise to the fact that there are mysteries that lie waiting to be uncovered. Now that some of the essentials for procedurally generating a world are in place, it’s time to add more visual storytelling into the mix in order to create a more immersive world that will connect the player to the history of the Crowfall universe and the lore and allows for a richer fabric on which players can create the war stories of Crowfall.
  14. Crowfall is a game that doesn’t use the sort of traditional storytelling that’s common to role-playing games, i.e. usually executed via missions or cinematic moments. Instead, Crowfall uses “visual storytelling”, telling a story without the use of language or text. Visual Storytelling: Bringin Worlds To Life When you enter the worlds of Crowfall, you will quickly become aware of your role as an Eternal Champion in a dying world, fighting for the gods. However, how your personal story in the game unfolds is unique to you. This is similar to looking at a narrative painting or work of art and find that there is enough information visually to give you a sense of a story without needing words or an explanation behind it. Then, as a viewer, you put yourself into the image and create your own interpretation from the things you see. Often when viewing art we piece together a story in our minds that creates the context for what we are viewing based on our frame of reference, experiences and aspirations. In that way, we create a story in our mind that we “see” as part of that piece of art and because it is “our” story it is more personal and more meaningful. Visual storytelling in games is how we personalize the story to the player and give context to the greater narrative threads in the world that evolve as you play. Storytelling in Crowfall is different from other games in that we don’t have a single narrative that every player follows as they play. Crowfall features a dynamic world where many of the elements are responsive to player choices, actions and motivations. In this way, the game offers players the ability to be at the center of a series of unfolding events in a story that is given context by the players themselves. Up to this point in the development cycle, we’ve been focused on the essential systems that make up our core gameplay experience and proving out our procedural world generation technology. These systems are the foundation of our gameplay and create the playscape for our storytelling. Crowfall has deep and rich lore that connects the player to the creation of the universe and the events leading up to the current state of the dying worlds. We also have a pantheon of gods that assert their own influence over the Crows (players) and these worlds. Although many of the facets of the story may not be visible now, as we continue to evolve our world generation we will begin layering in more visual storytelling. This process will reveal our overarching storyline and introduce the influences that are impacting the Crowfall Universe. The goal is to create a living world that sets the stage for players to create their own stories and build their legacies. Ancient History: Connectin Players To The Gods The Crowfall universe was once completely uninhabited by anyone other than the Stoneborn, the children of Gaia and Kane. These firstborn sons erected monumental temples and structures in honor of the gods and created the first examples of architecture in these worlds. Temple Environment Concept Stoneborn temples and structures were built in reverence to the gods when no other beings yet existed. They are reflective of Crowfall’s ancient history and are a visual thread connecting players to the gods. These structures have withstood the test of time, but we see them now as ruins in the dying worlds as a result of the impact of the corruptive influence of the Hunger, the mysterious contagion that is spreading across the worlds. Concept of Ancient Stoneborn Ruins found in the World Recent History: What Existed Before The Worlds Became Corrupted In more recent history, other races and creatures have begun to inhabit these worlds and are leaving their marks on it. As you arrive as a Crow, the worlds are deteriorating, dying. With time running out, there are tribes and forces roaming the worlds in search of valuable relics and resources, valuable artifacts, left behind by the people who once inhabited these places. Recently, we saw the rise of the war tribes in the world, but aside from these tribes, there’s very little evidence of the people who originally populated and settled this world, peacefully or otherwise. Currently, through the efforts of both design work and art production we are building the gameplay and visual narrative to give context to those who were once here and to tell the story of these worlds. We have a lot of art that hasn’t been implemented yet into the game. We have a couple of ways of bringing this to fruition. Some world environment pieces, or “parcels”, utilize what we call data layers. These are layers of the world set design that are turned on and off to create a feeling of totally new gameplay areas. This is where art is able to do the most custom-crafted storytelling experience. Although we are limited by the boundaries of the parcel itself, within that parcel we can lay in props any way we choose. We’ve already begun using these data layers to set up the war tribe and military camps found in our most recent campaign worlds. If you’ve played in any of our recent factional wars or campaigns, you are familiar with the forts and keeps in the siege zones. Players find and use resources to build up these strongholds to a fully-constructed state to hold and contest over. Outside of the siege zones, it would make sense to see the ruins of, and to tell the story of, additional battles from years gone by. In this concept, you see some remains of an old stone wall that may have been the gate to a great city from the past. A caravan of some sort looks like it was traveling through the gate, maybe in an attempt to escape when war broke out. In any case, nature has started to reclaim the relics left behind, and we know that this must have happened a long time ago. We get the sense of a story of a world left in turmoil and ruin from an image like this one. The combinatory possibilities utilizing data layers within natural terrain parcels gives us many opportunities to create areas within the world that look and feel different and reinforce the narrative of a dying world. In one area, the parcel may be crafted with this type of set dressing in place, or it could be entirely natural and wild without any architectural remains. Some of these parcels may be built to contain multiple data layers that can be turned on or off for additional storytelling impact. We might have a village alongside a road that would become our base data layer set. Then we could turn on a layer that contains vines and moss covering the dilapidated houses to tell the story of a village that has long been abandoned. Or we might turn on the smoldering and charred layer with ransacked looking crates and wagons in the street to tell the story of a war tribe having passed through recently and left destruction in their wake. We can create this level of depth throughout the game worlds to build greater visual diversity and interest in the world, exposing a robust history unique to each world. In addition to the visual storytelling we are planning, we are also building variant designs for the layout of the forts and keeps. If you’ve been testing along with us you know that the current fort and keep layout is the same across all the worlds. We plan to start diversifying these areas to give a texture that connects the player to the world and the events that led to the current state. To complement these new layouts, we are also planning on adding in a variety of textures for the walls to add even more flavor and character. Final Notes We’ve been procedurally generating new maps for campaigns for months now. The worlds are evolving into unique and diverse areas that are interesting to explore. As a team, we’ve always wanted to push the look and feel of the world much further to add more depth that gives rise to the fact that there are mysteries that lie waiting to be uncovered. Now that some of the essentials for procedurally generating a world are in place, it’s time to add more visual storytelling into the mix in order to create a more immersive world that will connect the player to the history of the Crowfall universe and the lore and allows for a richer fabric on which players can create the war stories of Crowfall. Wie gefallen Dir die neuen Grafiken? Ganzen Artikel lesen
  15. The Trial of Ilara ended Thursday, May 2, with Balance claiming the final victory in what had shaped up to be a hotly-contested nail-biter. Naturally, the Crowfall community has been anxiously awaiting news about what’s coming next. As mentioned by Creative Director J. Todd Coleman in the ACE Q&A for May, we have not yet given our date on the start of the next trial as we are hard at work on The God Trials, update 5.90, our next release that’s coming right around the corner. We’re trying to leave ourselves a little bit of flexibility but we will give you notice of when the next trial campaign is coming. We are excited to share that our plan is to release The God Trials update to our TEST server next week. To ensure we get the benefit of your great feedback, we are hoping that you login to play on TEST. Those who spend four hours or more on TEST this month will receive the Sapphire tankard reward. As soon as the update moves to our LIVE playtest server, we will start a non-sanctioned, regular campaign on LIVE, running a few days to a week. This will not be a Trial of the Gods campaign. In short order, following the conclusion the non-sanctioned campaign, we’ll return our Crows to the challenge of facing the trials put before you by the gods, with the launch of our next Trial of the Gods campaign. So, prepare for an exciting next few weeks with lots of great gameplay heading your way. The God Trials milestone contains a number of very positive improvements that will enhance your gameplay experience as well as performance improvements.
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